Colorful marine fish tank stocked with tangs and coral.

Colorful marine fish tank stocked with tangs and coral.

It’s tough to beat the captivating mix of beauty, motion and colors that a marine fish tank brings to a home or office.

I remember the first time I saw a marine fish tank. It was on a trip to the Coney Island Aquarium with my grandparents when I was around 5 years old. I was immediately taken by the amazing display of tropical saltwater fish in the tank.

The vibrant colors of the fish and their unique shapes were unlike anything I had ever seen before. I stood there for what seemed like forever mesmerized by the constant swirl of colors in motion as the fish darted around through their few hundred gallon home.

Those days, seeing a saltwater tank was not as common as it is today. In fact, that tank, with it’s fake coral and decorations would pale in comparison to many tanks that are now common at restaurants, doctor’s offices and even many private homes. But seeing that marine fish tank was enough to instill a lifelong love of fish, especially saltwater fish, in me.

That love has resulting in me having more fish tanks (both fresh and saltwater) than I can count over the years and getting a BS degree in Marine Science.

This site is for other marine fish tank nerds like me and those who aspire to be one. Together we’ll explore the set up and maintenance of saltwater tanks. The tools and products needed to maintain them. And the creatures that inhabit them.

We’ll also examine their beauty (through pictures and videos) as well as look at some of the more controversial issues surrounding the aquarium hobby industry.

So thanks for visiting this site and hope you’ll come back often to join us as we explore the wonder of the marine fish tank!

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Of all the species of fish I’ve had in my fish tanks over the years, there’s one that stands out above the others as my all-time favorite.

It’s the Snowflake Moray Eel.

I’ve always been mesmerized by Moray Eels. Watching their heads poke out their lairs with their mouths rhythmically opening and closing.

Combine that with the beauty and attitude of the Snowflake Moray and you’ve got an awesome marine fish tank inhabitant.

These eels are commonly found in aquarium stores and are instantly recognizable by their beautiful white bodies covered with black, brownish and yellow spots. They are also fairly hardy and mostly reef safe. Just make sure you don’t have any crabs, lobsters,  or shrimp in the tank because the Snowflake will make a meal out of them.

They are also expert escape artists…a fact that I know firsthand.

One night I was up late watching TV in my room where my tank was located. Knowing their reputation, I had a full hood on the tank and covered up the holes for the heater, filter, etc. with plastic to keep everyone in the tank. As I was watching TV, all of a sudden I thought I saw a flash out of the corner of my eye. I thought I had imagined it, but after a minute decided I better go investigate.

I looked in the tank and didn’t see my Snowflake Moray and then looked behind the tank and, sure enough, there he was slithering around on the floor like a snake. (And, if I tell you the gap between the plastic and the tank hood couldn’t have been more than 1″ or so, yet he was able to launch himself perfectly through it! )

I quickly got my net and, luckily, he slithered right into it (which was great because I really didn’t want to get my hand bit by an eel at 1 in the morning!). I placed him back in the tank where he swam straight to his favorite rock pile and lived happily for another year or so (with no more escape attempts).

Their escape artists tendencies aside, I still love Snowflake Morays. And they’re also voracious eaters which makes feeding time a lot of fun. Here’s a video of one devouring some frozen brine shrimp…

There’s no shortage of interesting and beautiful inhabitants you could add to your marine fish tank. But the Snowflake Moray Eel is firmly implanted at the top of my list of favorites.

What’s at the top of your list of favorites? Please share them in the comment section below.

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A Critical, Yet Often Overlooked Piece of Equipment for your Marine Fish Tank

Sure, all the “sexy” pieces of equipment for marine fish tanks get most of the attention…the tank itself, lighting, filtration, etc. But there’s one critical piece of the puzzle that often gets overlooked. And it’s one that’s not so much for sake your marine tank’s inhabitants as for yours. I’m talking about a GFI, or [...]

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Improve Your Reef Aquarium Put a Lionfish

Nothing brings together with both and splendor in the sea more than a lionfish. Lionfish having a scientific name Pterois Volitans is not only incredibly lovely with their gracefully streaming fins, spectacular coloration, cautious movements and fish-gulping mouths, however they are also venomous sea fish that are ready with venomous spines able of giving you agonizing stings.

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What To Consider When Buying Salt Water Fish

If you are interested in getting a saltwater fish tank, it means you probably want to have a load of lovely tropical fish in your home. But be warned they take more care than a freshwater equivalent. When choosing your new purchase, always buy the biggest tank you can afford assuming you have sufficient space available.

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#1 Way For Your Saltwater Aquarium Setup – Choosing A Tank

Following on from our introduction to saltwater aquariums this segment is designed to give you some idea of a typical saltwater aquarium setup.

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Saltwater Fish Tanks – Finding the Perfect Location

Knowing where to locate your salt water tank is half the battle to providing a good home for your new fish. You do not want to put the tank too near sunlight. This can encourage the growth of algae as well as causing overheating problems. You do not want to put it somewhere it would be in a draft either as you want to keep the tank water within a certain temperature range.

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The Beauty And Variety Within A Saltwater Aquarium

A salt water aquarium is sometimes for the better experienced aquarist as it is more maintenance-intensive and pricey. Depending on the kind of salt water fish tank set up chosen, these aquariums can cost from around $650 for a fish only with live rock set-up to $1300 and more for buying and setting up a coral reef aquarium. Saltwater aquarium fish are hard to look after and also dear, generally coming with a price tag of about $15 and infrequently much more. Most nevertheless , will agree that with regard to beauty, saltwater aquarium fish are surpassingly spectacular to their freshwater opposite numbers.

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So You Want Live Rock In Your Saltwater Aquarium?

These live organisms are of good value for your fish tank or aquarium because they make a extremely natural environment for your fish. Live rock will have crabs, algae, worms, shellfish as well as bacteria, and all these will be moved to your tank to form an environment as close to the real deal as practical. Salt water live rock is the one that is most assured to offer you as many organisms as possible. Salt water aquarium live rock has made it simple for many of us to keep saltwater aquariums.

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Salt Water Aquariums – Nitrogen Levels

With salt water aquariums it is very important to keep the nitrogen levels down or else the fish will die. Fish are living creatures and like humans they will eat food and release waste. The release of waste material leads to increased levels of nitrogen and carbon dioxide in the water. The carbon dioxide is removed either by algae living in the tank or by the process of aeration.

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Saltwater Supplies For Your Fish Tank – Part 2

The rest of the 10 basic saltwater fish supplies you can get to ensure that you get started correctly:

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